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Construction update | March 9-18

Construction Updates - Fri, 03/08/2013 - 17:03

Stockton Street covered walkway

A covered walkway has been installed on Stockton Street next to the site where crews are installing underground walls.

During the next 10 days, construction to prepare for tunneling will continue in SoMa and Union Square. No Central Subway construction is planned to occur in Chinatown or North Beach.

Descriptions of construction impacts in each neighborhood are available here or at the links below. We also post construction, traffic detour and Muni impact information on our project Google Map.

Construction impacts are planned to change at these locations by March 18:

  • Southern SoMa (Harrison to King/Berry): Full closure of 4th Street between Harrison and Bryant will be in effect from Friday, March 8, at 8 p.m. until Sunday, March 10. At all other times, two lanes of traffic will remain open on this block. Launch box construction will continue.
  • Union Square: Starting next week, the contractor will begin working extended hours (until 10 p.m.) on weekdays and during the day on Saturdays. Stockton Street between Geary and Ellis will remain closed to vehicle traffic. Ellis Street between Stockton and Powell will remain closed to westbound traffic.

At these locations, current construction impacts are planned to continue until March 18:

  • Northern SoMa (Market to Harrison): One lane will remain closed to traffic on 4th Street between Market and Stevenson. Two lanes of traffic will remain closed on 4th Street between Howard and Folsom. One lane will remain closed on 4th Street between Folsom and Harrison.
  • Chinatown: No construction planned
  • North Beach: No construction planned

We appreciate your patience and support while we build this essential upgrade to San Francisco’s public transportation system.

Categories: Construction Updates

Introducing Big Alma and Mom Chung, the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines

Featured News - Thu, 03/07/2013 - 13:42

  Robbins_20130220_10_08_12

Mom Chung, shown here, will construct the tunnel for southbound trains. More photos of both TBMs are available on our Flickr page. (Photo courtesy of The Robbins Company)

We are excited to introduce Big Alma and Mom Chung, the tunnel boring machines (TBMs) that will excavate and construct the Central Subway tunnels. Named Big Alma, after “Big Alma” de Bretteville Spreckels, and Mom Chung, after Dr. Margaret “Mom” Chung, the machines will begin tunneling later this year, starting in SoMa and heading north under 4th Street and Stockton Street through Union Square, Chinatown and North Beach. A press release about the TBMs is available online here.

The first of the machines, Mom Chung, is expected to arrive in San Francisco in April. The 300-foot-long machine will be assembled within an excavation on 4th Street between Harrison and Bryant streets and will start building the tunnel for southbound trains about two months later. Big Alma will arrive soon after Mom Chung to construct the northbound tunnel.

As tunneling proceeds, updates about the TBMs, including photos of the machines and the tunnels, will be posted on Twitter at the usernames @BigAlmatheTBM and @MomChungtheTBM. You can learn more about them on our website, at www.centralsubwaysf.com/tbm-name.

A IMG_7664 PS

The front of the TBM, called the cutter head, spins as it excavates. In this photo Mom Chung is being tested before being disassembled for transport to San Francisco. (Photo courtesy of Barnard Impregilo Healy)

The names were selected by the public in an online poll held in January. Participants could select up to two names, one for each TBM. Of the 1,453 responses, Big Alma was the top vote-getter at 682 votes. Mom Chung took second place with 487 votes, closely followed by Firebelle Lil (451 votes), Mary Ellen (437 votes) and Juana (148 votes).

In tunneling tradition, the custom of naming TBMs is believed to bring good luck to tunneling projects. The names will remain in official use by the SFMTA and the tunneling contractor throughout the duration of the project.

“Big Alma and Mom Chung will construct San Francisco’s first new subway tunnel in decades, bringing together neighborhoods of our city that have long been in need of improved public transit,” said SFMTA Director of Transportation Ed Reiskin. “We are happy to have included the public in this exciting part of tunneling tradition. We thank everyone who voted for contributing to this important project.”

big_alma

Big Alma, shown here, is still being assembled. She will arrive in San Francisco after Mom Chung to construct the northbound tunnel.

Each TBM consists of a rotating cutter wheel (the cutter head), a cylindrical steel shell (the shield) and a 300-foot train of tunnel-building mechanisms (the trailing gear). The TBMs will arrive in several parts, to be assembled at the site on 4th Street between Harrison and Bryant streets where tunneling will begin.

About the Winning Names:

“Big Alma” de Bretteville Spreckels (1881-1968): Known as “Big Alma” (she was 6 feet tall) and “The Great-Grandmother of San Francisco,” Alma de Bretteville Spreckels was a wealthy socialite and philanthropist who, among her many accomplishments, persuaded her first husband, sugar magnate Adolph B. Spreckels, to fund the design and construction of the California Palace of the Legion of Honor at Land’s End in San Francisco.  A model in her youth, Spreckels was the inspiration for the “Victory” statue atop the Dewey Monument in the center of Union Square.

Dr. Margaret “Mom” Chung (1889-1959) was the country’s first female Chinese-American physician, practicing in the heart of San Francisco’s Chinatown. During World War II she “adopted” more than a thousand “sons,” most of them American servicemen, mentoring them, sending them presents and sharing meals with them during and after the war. She was also one of the earliest supporters of women in the Navy. When one of her “sons” became a congressman, he filed the first legislation to create a female branch of the Navy in response to a phone call from “Mom Chung.”

Categories: News

Introducing Big Alma and Mom Chung, the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines

Community News - Thu, 03/07/2013 - 13:42

  Robbins_20130220_10_08_12

Mom Chung, shown here, will construct the tunnel for southbound trains. More photos of both TBMs are available on our Flickr page. (Photo courtesy of The Robbins Company)

We are excited to introduce Big Alma and Mom Chung, the tunnel boring machines (TBMs) that will excavate and construct the Central Subway tunnels. Named Big Alma, after “Big Alma” de Bretteville Spreckels, and Mom Chung, after Dr. Margaret “Mom” Chung, the machines will begin tunneling later this year, starting in SoMa and heading north under 4th Street and Stockton Street through Union Square, Chinatown and North Beach. A press release about the TBMs is available online here.

The first of the machines, Mom Chung, is expected to arrive in San Francisco in April. The 300-foot-long machine will be assembled within an excavation on 4th Street between Harrison and Bryant streets and will start building the tunnel for southbound trains about two months later. Big Alma will arrive soon after Mom Chung to construct the northbound tunnel.

As tunneling proceeds, updates about the TBMs, including photos of the machines and the tunnels, will be posted on Twitter at the usernames @BigAlmatheTBM and @MomChungtheTBM. You can learn more about them on our website, at www.centralsubwaysf.com/tbm-name.

A IMG_7664 PS

The front of the TBM, called the cutter head, spins as it excavates. In this photo Mom Chung is being tested before being disassembled for transport to San Francisco. (Photo courtesy of Barnard Impregilo Healy)

The names were selected by the public in an online poll held in January. Participants could select up to two names, one for each TBM. Of the 1,453 responses, Big Alma was the top vote-getter at 682 votes. Mom Chung took second place with 487 votes, closely followed by Firebelle Lil (451 votes), Mary Ellen (437 votes) and Juana (148 votes).

In tunneling tradition, the custom of naming TBMs is believed to bring good luck to tunneling projects. The names will remain in official use by the SFMTA and the tunneling contractor throughout the duration of the project.

“Big Alma and Mom Chung will construct San Francisco’s first new subway tunnel in decades, bringing together neighborhoods of our city that have long been in need of improved public transit,” said SFMTA Director of Transportation Ed Reiskin. “We are happy to have included the public in this exciting part of tunneling tradition. We thank everyone who voted for contributing to this important project.”

big_alma

Big Alma, shown here, is still being assembled. She will arrive in San Francisco after Mom Chung to construct the northbound tunnel.

Each TBM consists of a rotating cutter wheel (the cutter head), a cylindrical steel shell (the shield) and a 300-foot train of tunnel-building mechanisms (the trailing gear). The TBMs will arrive in several parts, to be assembled at the site on 4th Street between Harrison and Bryant streets where tunneling will begin.

About the Winning Names:

“Big Alma” de Bretteville Spreckels (1881-1968): Known as “Big Alma” (she was 6 feet tall) and “The Great-Grandmother of San Francisco,” Alma de Bretteville Spreckels was a wealthy socialite and philanthropist who, among her many accomplishments, persuaded her first husband, sugar magnate Adolph B. Spreckels, to fund the design and construction of the California Palace of the Legion of Honor at Land’s End in San Francisco.  A model in her youth, Spreckels was the inspiration for the “Victory” statue atop the Dewey Monument in the center of Union Square.

Dr. Margaret “Mom” Chung (1889-1959) was the country’s first female Chinese-American physician, practicing in the heart of San Francisco’s Chinatown. During World War II she “adopted” more than a thousand “sons,” most of them American servicemen, mentoring them, sending them presents and sharing meals with them during and after the war. She was also one of the earliest supporters of women in the Navy. When one of her “sons” became a congressman, he filed the first legislation to create a female branch of the Navy in response to a phone call from “Mom Chung.”

Categories: Community News

Introducing Big Alma and Mom Chung, the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines

Press Releases - Thu, 03/07/2013 - 13:42

  Robbins_20130220_10_08_12

Mom Chung, shown here, will construct the tunnel for southbound trains. More photos of both TBMs are available on our Flickr page. (Photo courtesy of The Robbins Company)

We are excited to introduce Big Alma and Mom Chung, the tunnel boring machines (TBMs) that will excavate and construct the Central Subway tunnels. Named Big Alma, after “Big Alma” de Bretteville Spreckels, and Mom Chung, after Dr. Margaret “Mom” Chung, the machines will begin tunneling later this year, starting in SoMa and heading north under 4th Street and Stockton Street through Union Square, Chinatown and North Beach. A press release about the TBMs is available online here.

The first of the machines, Mom Chung, is expected to arrive in San Francisco in April. The 300-foot-long machine will be assembled within an excavation on 4th Street between Harrison and Bryant streets and will start building the tunnel for southbound trains about two months later. Big Alma will arrive soon after Mom Chung to construct the northbound tunnel.

As tunneling proceeds, updates about the TBMs, including photos of the machines and the tunnels, will be posted on Twitter at the usernames @BigAlmatheTBM and @MomChungtheTBM. You can learn more about them on our website, at www.centralsubwaysf.com/tbm-name.

A IMG_7664 PS

The front of the TBM, called the cutter head, spins as it excavates. In this photo Mom Chung is being tested before being disassembled for transport to San Francisco. (Photo courtesy of Barnard Impregilo Healy)

The names were selected by the public in an online poll held in January. Participants could select up to two names, one for each TBM. Of the 1,453 responses, Big Alma was the top vote-getter at 682 votes. Mom Chung took second place with 487 votes, closely followed by Firebelle Lil (451 votes), Mary Ellen (437 votes) and Juana (148 votes).

In tunneling tradition, the custom of naming TBMs is believed to bring good luck to tunneling projects. The names will remain in official use by the SFMTA and the tunneling contractor throughout the duration of the project.

“Big Alma and Mom Chung will construct San Francisco’s first new subway tunnel in decades, bringing together neighborhoods of our city that have long been in need of improved public transit,” said SFMTA Director of Transportation Ed Reiskin. “We are happy to have included the public in this exciting part of tunneling tradition. We thank everyone who voted for contributing to this important project.”

big_alma

Big Alma, shown here, is still being assembled. She will arrive in San Francisco after Mom Chung to construct the northbound tunnel.

Each TBM consists of a rotating cutter wheel (the cutter head), a cylindrical steel shell (the shield) and a 300-foot train of tunnel-building mechanisms (the trailing gear). The TBMs will arrive in several parts, to be assembled at the site on 4th Street between Harrison and Bryant streets where tunneling will begin.

About the Winning Names:

“Big Alma” de Bretteville Spreckels (1881-1968): Known as “Big Alma” (she was 6 feet tall) and “The Great-Grandmother of San Francisco,” Alma de Bretteville Spreckels was a wealthy socialite and philanthropist who, among her many accomplishments, persuaded her first husband, sugar magnate Adolph B. Spreckels, to fund the design and construction of the California Palace of the Legion of Honor at Land’s End in San Francisco.  A model in her youth, Spreckels was the inspiration for the “Victory” statue atop the Dewey Monument in the center of Union Square.

Dr. Margaret “Mom” Chung (1889-1959) was the country’s first female Chinese-American physician, practicing in the heart of San Francisco’s Chinatown. During World War II she “adopted” more than a thousand “sons,” most of them American servicemen, mentoring them, sending them presents and sharing meals with them during and after the war. She was also one of the earliest supporters of women in the Navy. When one of her “sons” became a congressman, he filed the first legislation to create a female branch of the Navy in response to a phone call from “Mom Chung.”

Categories: Press Releases

North Beach update: Board of Supervisors approve key component of TBM retrieval relocation plan

Featured News - Tue, 03/05/2013 - 16:39

pagoda

The Central Subway tunnels would end here, at the Pagoda Palace in North Beach, under a plan to relocate the retrieval site for the project’s tunnel boring machines.

The Board of Supervisors today voted unanimously to pass a key component of the plan to relocate the retrieval site for the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines (TBMs) to the Pagoda Palace. The Board’s vote authorizes a Special Use District that will allow the owner to move forward with a previously approved development project after the building is demolished and the TBMs are extracted. You can view a press release about the vote online here.

The Pagoda Palace is the preferred location to remove the TBMs. As a result of community objections to the original plan, which involved removing the TBMs on Columbus Avenue, the SFMTA initiated a review of alternatives. Removing the TBMs at the site of the Pagoda Palace, a building that has been vacant for nearly 20 years, minimizes local construction impacts and leaves no physical impediments to a potential extension of the T Third Line to North Beach and Fisherman’s Wharf.

The retrieval site change will also require National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) clearance by the Federal Transit Administration. If all of the necessary legislative processes and approvals occur by early April, then the demolition of the Pagoda Palace site can commence.

We will continue to update the community as the retrieval site change moves forward. Thank you for your participation in this process.

Categories: News

North Beach update: Board of Supervisors approve key component of TBM retrieval relocation plan

Community News - Tue, 03/05/2013 - 16:39

pagoda

The Central Subway tunnels would end here, at the Pagoda Palace in North Beach, under a plan to relocate the retrieval site for the project’s tunnel boring machines.

The Board of Supervisors today voted unanimously to pass a key component of the plan to relocate the retrieval site for the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines (TBMs) to the Pagoda Palace. The Board’s vote authorizes a Special Use District that will allow the owner to move forward with a previously approved development project after the building is demolished and the TBMs are extracted. You can view a press release about the vote online here.

The Pagoda Palace is the preferred location to remove the TBMs. As a result of community objections to the original plan, which involved removing the TBMs on Columbus Avenue, the SFMTA initiated a review of alternatives. Removing the TBMs at the site of the Pagoda Palace, a building that has been vacant for nearly 20 years, minimizes local construction impacts and leaves no physical impediments to a potential extension of the T Third Line to North Beach and Fisherman’s Wharf.

The retrieval site change will also require National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) clearance by the Federal Transit Administration. If all of the necessary legislative processes and approvals occur by early April, then the demolition of the Pagoda Palace site can commence.

We will continue to update the community as the retrieval site change moves forward. Thank you for your participation in this process.

Categories: Community News

North Beach update: Board of Supervisors unanimously supports key Pagoda Palace plan item

Featured News - Tue, 02/26/2013 - 16:15

San Francisco city hall

Today at City Hall the Board of Supervisors voted on a key component of the plan to relocate the retrieval site for the Central Subway’s tunneling machines. (Photo courtesy Flickr user Alaskan Dude.)

Today the Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to support a key component of the plan to relocate the retrieval site for the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines (TBMs) to the Pagoda Palace in North Beach. The item, an ordinance to create a Special Use District (SUD) for the Powell Street property, would allow the owner to move forward with a previously approved development project after the building is demolished and the TBMs extracted. A second and final vote to approve the ordinance is expected at next week’s Board of Supervisors meeting.

To relocate the retrieval site from Columbus Avenue, the SFMTA has signed a lease with the owner of the Pagoda Palace property. The two-year lease will allow the agency to demolish the building and extract the TBMs. The state-of-the-art tunneling machines are expected to reach North Beach in 2014.

The relocation plan is undergoing review by the Federal Transit Administration for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). If all of the necessary approvals occur by April 1, then the demolition of the Pagoda Palace building can then commence.

We will continue to keep the community informed as we work to respond to concerns about the original retrieval plan. Thank you for your continued participation as we work to finalize the retrieval site change.

Categories: News

North Beach update: Board of Supervisors unanimously supports key Pagoda Palace plan item

Community News - Tue, 02/26/2013 - 16:15

San Francisco city hall

Today at City Hall the Board of Supervisors voted on a key component of the plan to relocate the retrieval site for the Central Subway’s tunneling machines. (Photo courtesy Flickr user Alaskan Dude.)

Today the Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to support a key component of the plan to relocate the retrieval site for the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines (TBMs) to the Pagoda Palace in North Beach. The item, an ordinance to create a Special Use District (SUD) for the Powell Street property, would allow the owner to move forward with a previously approved development project after the building is demolished and the TBMs extracted. A second and final vote to approve the ordinance is expected at next week’s Board of Supervisors meeting.

To relocate the retrieval site from Columbus Avenue, the SFMTA has signed a lease with the owner of the Pagoda Palace property. The two-year lease will allow the agency to demolish the building and extract the TBMs. The state-of-the-art tunneling machines are expected to reach North Beach in 2014.

The relocation plan is undergoing review by the Federal Transit Administration for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). If all of the necessary approvals occur by April 1, then the demolition of the Pagoda Palace building can then commence.

We will continue to keep the community informed as we work to respond to concerns about the original retrieval plan. Thank you for your continued participation as we work to finalize the retrieval site change.

Categories: Community News

North Beach update: Land Use Committee recommends approval of key component of TBM retrieval relocation plan

Featured News - Mon, 02/25/2013 - 16:17

pagoda

The Central Subway tunnels would end here, at the Pagoda Palace in North Beach, under a plan to relocate the retrieval site for the project’s tunnel boring machines.

Today the Board of Supervisors Land Use Committee voted 3-0 to recommend approval of a Special Use District (SUD) for the Pagoda Palace (1731-1741 Powell Street). The SUD, a key component of the plan to relocate the retrieval site for the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines (TBMs) from Columbus Avenue, would allow the owner of the Pagoda Palace to move forward with a previously approved development project after the building is demolished and the TBMs extracted.

Tomorrow the full Board of Supervisors will consider the SUD. This meeting will be held at 2 p.m. at City Hall, Room 250.

Under the retrieval site relocation plan, the Pagoda Palace will be demolished this spring. Central Subway crews will then prepare the site for arrival of the TBMs. The state-of-the-art tunneling machines are expected to reach North Beach in 2014.

We will continue to keep the community informed as we work to respond to concerns about the original retrieval plan. Thank you for your continued participation and patience.

Categories: News

North Beach update: Land Use Committee recommends approval of key component of TBM retrieval relocation plan

Community News - Mon, 02/25/2013 - 16:17

pagoda

The Central Subway tunnels would end here, at the Pagoda Palace in North Beach, under a plan to relocate the retrieval site for the project’s tunnel boring machines.

Today the Board of Supervisors Land Use Committee voted 3-0 to recommend approval of a Special Use District (SUD) for the Pagoda Palace (1731-1741 Powell Street). The SUD, a key component of the plan to relocate the retrieval site for the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines (TBMs) from Columbus Avenue, would allow the owner of the Pagoda Palace to move forward with a previously approved development project after the building is demolished and the TBMs extracted.

Tomorrow the full Board of Supervisors will consider the SUD. This meeting will be held at 2 p.m. at City Hall, Room 250.

Under the retrieval site relocation plan, the Pagoda Palace will be demolished this spring. Central Subway crews will then prepare the site for arrival of the TBMs. The state-of-the-art tunneling machines are expected to reach North Beach in 2014.

We will continue to keep the community informed as we work to respond to concerns about the original retrieval plan. Thank you for your continued participation and patience.

Categories: Community News

North Beach update: SFMTA Board approves Pagoda lease, construction costs

Featured News - Tue, 02/19/2013 - 15:48

Pagoda inside 5b

Inside the Pagoda Palace, a former theater that will be demolished under a plan to relocate the retrieval site for the machines that will build the Central Subway tunnels.

Today the SFMTA Board of Directors voted unanimously to approve key components of the plan to relocate the retrieval site of the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines (TBMs) from Columbus Avenue to the Pagoda Palace (1731-1741 Powell Street). The Board’s vote authorizes a two-year lease to utilize the Pagoda property. It also allows for the increased construction costs associated with the site change, including demolishing the existing structure and extending the Central Subway tunnels past the original site on Columbus Avenue.

The two-year lease, capped at $3.15 million, including $800,000 in rent and up to $2.35 million in ancillary fees, allows the SFMTA to demolish the existing structure and utilize the property to retrieve the TBMs. Total costs to the SFMTA, including the lease, demolition of the building and extraction of the TBMs, will not exceed $9.15 million. Additional details about the lease are available in this press release from the SFMTA.

Next week, the Board of Supervisors will consider a Special Use District (SUD) for the Pagoda Palace site. The SUD would allow the owner of the Pagoda Palace to move forward with a previously approved development project after the building is demolished and the TBMs extracted.

  • On Monday, February 25, the Board of Supervisors’ Land Use Committee will consider the SUD. This meeting will begin at 1:30 p.m. at City Hall, Room 263.
  • Should the SUD pass the Land Use Committee, it will go before the full Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, February 26. This meeting will be held at 2 p.m. at City Hall, Room 250.

Members of the public may comment on the SUD at the Land Use Committee meeting.

We thank the community, Mayor Lee, Supervisor David Chiu, numerous city agencies, and the property owner for their support and cooperation throughout this process. We will continue to keep you informed as we work to finalize the retrieval site change.

 

Categories: News

North Beach update: SFMTA Board approves Pagoda lease, construction costs

Community News - Tue, 02/19/2013 - 15:48

Pagoda inside 5b

Inside the Pagoda Palace, a former theater that will be demolished under a plan to relocate the retrieval site for the machines that will build the Central Subway tunnels.

Today the SFMTA Board of Directors voted unanimously to approve key components of the plan to relocate the retrieval site of the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines (TBMs) from Columbus Avenue to the Pagoda Palace (1731-1741 Powell Street). The Board’s vote authorizes a two-year lease to utilize the Pagoda property. It also allows for the increased construction costs associated with the site change, including demolishing the existing structure and extending the Central Subway tunnels past the original site on Columbus Avenue.

The two-year lease, capped at $3.15 million, including $800,000 in rent and up to $2.35 million in ancillary fees, allows the SFMTA to demolish the existing structure and utilize the property to retrieve the TBMs. Total costs to the SFMTA, including the lease, demolition of the building and extraction of the TBMs, will not exceed $9.15 million. Additional details about the lease are available in this press release from the SFMTA.

Next week, the Board of Supervisors will consider a Special Use District (SUD) for the Pagoda Palace site. The SUD would allow the owner of the Pagoda Palace to move forward with a previously approved development project after the building is demolished and the TBMs extracted.

  • On Monday, February 25, the Board of Supervisors’ Land Use Committee will consider the SUD. This meeting will begin at 1:30 p.m. at City Hall, Room 263.
  • Should the SUD pass the Land Use Committee, it will go before the full Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, February 26. This meeting will be held at 2 p.m. at City Hall, Room 250.

Members of the public may comment on the SUD at the Land Use Committee meeting.

We thank the community, Mayor Lee, Supervisor David Chiu, numerous city agencies, and the property owner for their support and cooperation throughout this process. We will continue to keep you informed as we work to finalize the retrieval site change.

 

Categories: Community News

North Beach update: Planning Commission votes to move TBM retrieval site relocation forward

Community News - Fri, 02/15/2013 - 15:45

Pagoda outside 3

The Pagoda Palace in North Beach, long considered an eyesore, will be demolished under a plan to relocate the retrieval site for the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines.

For the past two months, SFMTA staff and multiple city agencies have been working to allow the relocation of the retrieval site of the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines (TBMs) from Columbus Avenue to the Pagoda Palace (1731-1741 Powell Street). This effort has been undertaken in response to community concerns about construction and traffic disruption associated with the original plan.

On Wednesday the SFMTA completed lease negotiations with the owner of the Pagoda Palace. The lease, a major step forward in the agency’s efforts to relocate the retrieval site, allows for the demolition of the existing building and the use of the property to retrieve the TBMs. We thank the community, Mayor Lee, Supervisor David Chiu, numerous city agencies, and the property owner for their support and cooperation in achieving this agreement. You can view the press announcement about the lease agreement here.

Although several steps remain before the retrieval site relocation is finalized, yesterday two integral components of the relocation plan moved forward when the Planning Commission voted to approve a Conditional Use (CU) application and recommend a Special Use District (SUD) for the Pagoda Palace site. The SUD and CU would allow the owner of the Pagoda Palace to move forward with a previously approved development project after the building is demolished and the TBMs extracted.

In the coming weeks, items related to the relocation plan will be considered at the following meetings:

  • On Tuesday, February 19, the SFMTA Board of Directors will consider the Pagoda Palace lease. This meeting will begin at 1 p.m. at City Hall, Room 400.
  • On Monday, February 25, the Board of Supervisors’ Land Use Committee will consider the SUD. This meeting will begin at 1:30 p.m. at City Hall, Room 263.

As always, we welcome and encourage public comment at these meetings.

We will continue to keep you informed as we work to finalize the retrieval site change. We thank you for your continued participation as we work to respond to community concerns about construction in North Beach.

Categories: Community News

North Beach update: Planning Commission votes to move TBM retrieval site relocation forward

Featured News - Fri, 02/15/2013 - 15:45

Pagoda outside 3

The Pagoda Palace in North Beach, long considered an eyesore, will be demolished under a plan to relocate the retrieval site for the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines.

For the past two months, SFMTA staff and multiple city agencies have been working to allow the relocation of the retrieval site of the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines (TBMs) from Columbus Avenue to the Pagoda Palace (1731-1741 Powell Street). This effort has been undertaken in response to community concerns about construction and traffic disruption associated with the original plan.

On Wednesday the SFMTA completed lease negotiations with the owner of the Pagoda Palace. The lease, a major step forward in the agency’s efforts to relocate the retrieval site, allows for the demolition of the existing building and the use of the property to retrieve the TBMs. We thank the community, Mayor Lee, Supervisor David Chiu, numerous city agencies, and the property owner for their support and cooperation in achieving this agreement. You can view the press announcement about the lease agreement here.

Although several steps remain before the retrieval site relocation is finalized, yesterday two integral components of the relocation plan moved forward when the Planning Commission voted to approve a Conditional Use (CU) application and recommend a Special Use District (SUD) for the Pagoda Palace site. The SUD and CU would allow the owner of the Pagoda Palace to move forward with a previously approved development project after the building is demolished and the TBMs extracted.

In the coming weeks, items related to the relocation plan will be considered at the following meetings:

  • On Tuesday, February 19, the SFMTA Board of Directors will consider the Pagoda Palace lease. This meeting will begin at 1 p.m. at City Hall, Room 400.
  • On Monday, February 25, the Board of Supervisors’ Land Use Committee will consider the SUD. This meeting will begin at 1:30 p.m. at City Hall, Room 263.

As always, we welcome and encourage public comment at these meetings.

We will continue to keep you informed as we work to finalize the retrieval site change. We thank you for your continued participation as we work to respond to community concerns about construction in North Beach.

Categories: News

North Beach update: Planning Commission votes to move TBM retrieval site relocation forward

Press Releases - Fri, 02/15/2013 - 15:45

Pagoda outside 3

The Pagoda Palace in North Beach, long considered an eyesore, will be demolished under a plan to relocate the retrieval site for the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines.

For the past two months, SFMTA staff and multiple city agencies have been working to allow the relocation of the retrieval site of the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines (TBMs) from Columbus Avenue to the Pagoda Palace (1731-1741 Powell Street). This effort has been undertaken in response to community concerns about construction and traffic disruption associated with the original plan.

On Wednesday the SFMTA completed lease negotiations with the owner of the Pagoda Palace. The lease, a major step forward in the agency’s efforts to relocate the retrieval site, allows for the demolition of the existing building and the use of the property to retrieve the TBMs. We thank the community, Mayor Lee, Supervisor David Chiu, numerous city agencies, and the property owner for their support and cooperation in achieving this agreement. You can view the press announcement about the lease agreement here.

Although several steps remain before the retrieval site relocation is finalized, yesterday two integral components of the relocation plan moved forward when the Planning Commission voted to approve a Conditional Use (CU) application and recommend a Special Use District (SUD) for the Pagoda Palace site. The SUD and CU would allow the owner of the Pagoda Palace to move forward with a previously approved development project after the building is demolished and the TBMs extracted.

In the coming weeks, items related to the relocation plan will be considered at the following meetings:

  • On Tuesday, February 19, the SFMTA Board of Directors will consider the Pagoda Palace lease. This meeting will begin at 1 p.m. at City Hall, Room 400.
  • On Monday, February 25, the Board of Supervisors’ Land Use Committee will consider the SUD. This meeting will begin at 1:30 p.m. at City Hall, Room 263.

As always, we welcome and encourage public comment at these meetings.

We will continue to keep you informed as we work to finalize the retrieval site change. We thank you for your continued participation as we work to respond to community concerns about construction in North Beach.

Categories: Press Releases

Video: Inside the excavation where tunneling will begin

Construction Updates - Mon, 01/28/2013 - 15:07

Later this year construction of the Central Subway tunnels will begin on 4th Street beneath the I-80 overpass, within a major excavation known as a launch box. Excavation and construction of the launch box began last spring and is expected to continue through spring 2013. When it is complete, the launch box will reach a depth of about 50 feet and span almost the entire block between Harrison and Bryant streets. Tunnel boring machines will then excavate and construct the Central Subway tunnels, one for northbound trains and another for southbound trains.

The underground walls around the perimeter launch box have been completed. Now crews are excavating the launch box, and they recently completed construction of an access ramp.

Check out this video for a view beneath the roadway and to see the ongoing construction at the launch box site.

Categories: Construction Updates

Video: Inside the excavation where tunneling will begin

Featured News - Mon, 01/28/2013 - 15:07

Later this year construction of the Central Subway tunnels will begin on 4th Street beneath the I-80 overpass, within a major excavation known as a launch box. Excavation and construction of the launch box began last spring and is expected to continue through spring 2013. When it is complete, the launch box will reach a depth of about 50 feet and span almost the entire block between Harrison and Bryant streets. Tunnel boring machines will then excavate and construct the Central Subway tunnels, one for northbound trains and another for southbound trains.

The underground walls around the perimeter launch box have been completed. Now crews are excavating the launch box, and they recently completed construction of an access ramp.

Check out this video for a view beneath the roadway and to see the ongoing construction at the launch box site.

Categories: News

Vote to name the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines

Featured News - Tue, 01/15/2013 - 15:14

Vote now to help name the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines after historic San Francisco women. From left to right: Lillie “Firebelle Lil” Hitchcock Coit, “Big Alma” de Bretteville Spreckels, Margaret “Mom” Chung, Juana Briones and Mary Ellen Pleasant.

Now’s your chance – help us choose the names of the tunnel boring machines (TBMs) that will build the Central Subway tunnels! The TBMs, scheduled to arrive in San Francisco in spring 2013, will be named after prominent historic San Francisco women, pioneers in civil rights, commerce, medicine and the arts who have helped shape the San Francisco of the past, just as the Central Subway will help form the San Francisco of the future.

In tunneling tradition, the custom of naming TBMs is believed to bring good luck to tunneling projects. We are excited to include the public in this fun and important tunneling tradition.

To cast your vote, please visit www.centralsubwaysf.com/tbm-name.

Categories: News

Vote to name the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines

Community News - Tue, 01/15/2013 - 15:14

Vote now to help name the Central Subway’s tunnel boring machines after historic San Francisco women. From left to right: Lillie “Firebelle Lil” Hitchcock Coit, “Big Alma” de Bretteville Spreckels, Margaret “Mom” Chung, Juana Briones and Mary Ellen Pleasant.

Now’s your chance – help us choose the names of the tunnel boring machines (TBMs) that will build the Central Subway tunnels! The TBMs, scheduled to arrive in San Francisco in spring 2013, will be named after prominent historic San Francisco women, pioneers in civil rights, commerce, medicine and the arts who have helped shape the San Francisco of the past, just as the Central Subway will help form the San Francisco of the future.

In tunneling tradition, the custom of naming TBMs is believed to bring good luck to tunneling projects. We are excited to include the public in this fun and important tunneling tradition.

To cast your vote, please visit www.centralsubwaysf.com/tbm-name.

Categories: Community News

Attention SBE firms: Meet the potential prime contractors for the stations, track and systems contract

Contract News - Wed, 01/09/2013 - 17:18

A recent prime/sub-contractor meet-and-greet event for the Central Subway stations, track and systems contract.

The SFMTA invites all interested Small Business Enterprises (SBEs), Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs) and Local Business Enterprises (LBEs) to participate in a series of small business opportunity meetings with the potential prime contractors for the contract to construct the Central Subway stations, track and systems (Contract CN-1300). Each potential prime contractor will be holding a meeting to inform interested SBE firms of their bid preparation procedures, present potential opportunities for SBE firms and provide an opportunity to interact with representatives from the potential prime contractor teams.

A schedule of meetings can be viewed in this flier (PDF). The meetings will be held at the SFMTA headquarters at 1 South Van Ness Avenue, in the Candlestick/Corona Heights conference rooms on the 6th floor.

In addition, the SFMTA is providing technical assistance to small, disadvantaged and local businesses in preparation for the procurement of this major contract. More information, including office hours and a summary of available services, is available here (PDF).

Categories: Contract News

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